10 Komodo Dragons Hatch at San Antonio ZooThe reptile is an endangered species with an estimated 2,500 to 4,000 lizards left in the wild. Photo by Travis K./Shutterstock

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10 Komodo Dragons Hatch at San Antonio Zoo

The reptile is an endangered species with an estimated 2,500 to 4,000 lizards left in the wild.

Komodo dragons are the largest lizards in the world and are native to Indonesia.

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The San Antonio Zoo, in conjunction with the Houston Zoo announced today that they have successfully hatched 10 Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) as part of the zoo’s Special Survival Program. The hatchlings are the offspring of Kristika and Boga, a male who came from the Houston Zoo. Kristika laid her eggs March 8, 2021.

“This monumental hatching is a testament to the zoo’s persistence and commitment to conservation,” president and CEO of San Antonio Zoo Tim Morrow told KSAT.com. “The hatchlings are thriving, and we are looking forward to watching them grow and help preserve the existence of Komodo dragons.”

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No word yet on when and whether the reptiles will be available for viewing.


Komodo Dragon Reclassified As Endangered Species

A Visit to Indonesia’s Komodo National Park


The Komodo dragon was reclassified as Endangered by the The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species, up from Vulnerable, in September. The lizard, which can be found on the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, and Gili Motang, live very close to the sea and are the dominant apex predator in their ecosystems.

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Komodo Dragon Information

Komodo dragons are the largest lizards in the world and are native to Indonesia. The lizard is a carnivore and in the wild has been documented taking down large deer. The reptile is an endangered species with an estimated 2,500 to 4,000 lizards left in the wild. They live in Komodo National Park in Indonesia. The Komodo dragon is also potentially threatened by the invasive Asian common toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus). This species has left a trail of dead native species wherever it has been introduced, according to a 2017 study of the toad. If the amphibian gains a foothold on any of the islands where the Komodo dragon lives, it could result in population declines, as the toad is poisonous.