Venomous Eastern Brown Snake Crawls Toward Snake Catcher In Defensive DisplayThe majority of snake bite deaths that occur in Australia are from the Eastern brown snake or its cousin, the western brown snake.

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Venomous Eastern Brown Snake Crawls Toward Snake Catcher In Defensive Display

The Eastern brown snake is considered the second most venomous snake in the world.

The snake, once released from the confines of the snake bag, crawls toward Jake Stinson of Jake's Reptile Relocations with its head and part of its body in what Stinson calls a defensive striking position.

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Usually, when a snake catcher releases a snake back into the wild, the snake scurries in the opposite direction of the catcher, well because they don’t want to have anything to do with humans. In the case of a venomous  Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) in Australia, the snake, once released from the confines of the snake bag, crawls toward Jake Stinson of Jake’s Reptile Relocations with its head and part of its body in what Stinson calls a defensive striking position. The snake definitely looks angry in the video posted to Facebook.


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Stinson got the call last week about a snake in a concrete pile at a home in Bundaberg, Australia. After several attempts Stinson gets the venomous snake in the bag, but according to his Facebook post, the snake was still trying to escape the bag. The video shows Stinson rapidly shaking the snake bag in an effort to prevent the reptile from climbing up and out of the bag. Then he finally is able to secure the bag.

Eastern Brown Snake Shutterstock 509601340

The Eastern brown snake is considered the second most venomous snake in the world. By ChameleonsEye/Shutterstock

“…As soon as he is in the bag he is trying his hardest to climb the bag and come back out, and with his length he comes closer than many,” Stinson wrote on Facebook. “Once again I need to problem solve, I quickly spot a steel bar which I can use to barricade him to one side while I clip the bag, this is what you see me do at the end. With him sealed to one side I am safe to clip the bag without getting bitten on the face or through it.”


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Stinson noted in his post that the first instinct of this snake was to retreat. At any rate, it is an interesting video in how snake catchers in Australia have to think quickly when subduing these venomous snakes.

Eastern Brown Snake Information

The Eastern brown snake is considered the second most venomous snake in the world. The majority of snake bite deaths that occur in Australia are from this snake or its cousin, the western brown snake. The Eastern brown snake can be found throughout Australia and into New Guinea. The Eastern brown snake grows to about five to six feet in length and its venom produces hemotoxic and neurotoxic symptoms with immediate pain and swelling of the lymph nodes.