Watergum Australia Launches Cane Toad BustCane toads are now widespread throughout northeast NSW and are nearing the border in north west NSW in Australia. Photo by Ryan M.Bolton/Shutterstock

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Watergum Australia Launches Cane Toad Bust

The Great Cane Toad Bust aims to remove as many fertile adult cane toads from the wild before they can breed.

Cane toads are an invasive species in Australia with population estimates at more than 2 billion.

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Watergum, an Australian environmental organization has launched The Great Cane Toad Bust, a cane toad (Rhinella marina) culling event that will run from January 24 to January 30. The aim is for Aussies to remove and humanely euthanize as many cane toads as they possibly can to help control the populations of the invasive species.

The Great Cane Toad Bust aims to remove as many fertile adult cane toads from the wild before they can breed.


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“Toad busting is a highly effective form of cane toad control and can have a big impact on local populations,” Watergun wrote on its website. “We need Australians to step up and work together to impact cane toads on a national scale. The more people who get involved, the greater our impact will be! Let’s work together to impact cane toads!”


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The Watergum website allows for participants to upload their toad busting data, which includes the date the toads were removed, how many and where removed. Photos can also be uploaded to the site as well. The site also has information about the cane toad as well as what the toad looks like. For more information, visit the Watergum website.

Cane Toads in Australia

Cane toads are an invasive species in Australia. They were introduced to control the cane beetle in 1935, but the outcome has been disastrous. The species is now widespread throughout northeast NSW and are nearing the border in north west NSW. The poisonous toads have been linked to the decline of several native species, including quolls, certain snake species and goannas. And with each female capable of producing 70,000 babies every year, the amphibians have gotten way out of hand, eating and outcompeting native species for food, and killing most everything that tries to prey on them.

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