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San Diego Zoo Seeks Name For Monocled Cobra

The 4-foot-long leucistic monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia) that bit a dog and then evaded capture for several days in September in Los Angeles, Calif. w

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The 4-foot-long leucistic monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia) that bit a dog and then evaded capture for several days in September in Los Angeles, Calif. will soon go on display at the San Diego Zoo. The snake is coming out of quarantine and will make its debut at the zoo December 23, just in time for Christmas visitors. In the meantime, the zoo is holding a contest to name the snake, as she currently doesn’t have one.

 


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The name choices are:

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Adhira (“lightning”)
Saphēda (“white”)
Krīma (“cream”)
Cīnī (“sugar”)
Mōtī (“pearl”)
Sundara (“beautiful”)

The monocled cobra is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia. The snake grows to around 7-8 feet in length and are usually found in grasslands, scrublands and forests as well as human settlements and cities. They feed on small mammals such as rodents, and other snakes. This particular specimen was determined by the veterinarian who examined it to be about two years of age and in good health. 


John B. Virata keeps a ball python, two corn snakes, a king snake, and two leopard geckos. His first snake, a California kingsnake, was purchased at the Pet Place in Westminster, CA for $5. His first pet reptile was a green anole that arrived in a small box via mail order. Follow him on Twitter @johnvirata 

 

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