Asian Water Monitor Climbs Shelves At Thai 7-11

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Asian Water Monitor Climbs Shelves At Thai 7-11

A video of an Asian water monitor (Varanus salvator) climbing up a shelf in a 7-11 in Bangkok, Thailand has gone viral. The video opens with the giant

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A video of an Asian water monitor (Varanus salvator) climbing up a shelf in a 7-11 in Bangkok, Thailand has gone viral. The video opens with the giant lizard seemingly trying to open the cold case with his nose, (perhaps to grab a six pack of Singha) and when the door doesn’t open, decides to climb a shelf full of product. It is here that you see just how massive the monitor lizard is. All the while the bystanders are looking and commenting in obvious awe as the lizard easily scales the shelf, knocking plenty of products off the shelves as it reaches the top. The video then ends with the reptile resting atop the shelf of goods.


Asian Water Monitor Breeding And Care Tips

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Asian Water Monitors In Downtown Bangkok


Asian water monitors are found throughout much of Bangkok, including at Lumphini Park, located not far from the Silom area of Bangkok. The park is 142 acres, crated by King Rama VI in the 1920s and is full of Asian water monitors, from hatchlings to adults.

Asian water monitors are native to Eastern India and Sri Lanka, eastward through southeast Asia, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. They can grow to more than 8 feet in length, though most average around 5 feet in length. They are one of the few large lizards that folks keep as pets. The most famous water monitor is Kipling, who appeared in the Disney Channel show Jessie, which lasted four seasons, or 100 episodes.

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Asian water monitors are very popular amongst experienced reptile keepers due to their sociability as well as the sheer size of these reptiles. Once considered unpredictable amongst reptile keepers, captive breeding has led to socialization techniques that help to establish trust between the reptile keeper and the Asian water monitor.