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Columbian Redtail Boa

Boa constrictors (subspecies include Boa c. constrictor, B. c. imperator, B. c. occidentalis, etc.) are large, live-bearing snakes found in Central and South America.

The European Green Toad
Egg-Bound Turtle
Cagle's Map Turtle

Boa constrictors (subspecies include Boa c. constrictor, B. c. imperator, B. c. occidentalis, etc.) are large, live-bearing snakes found in Central and South America.

Hatchling boas generally measure 14 to 22 inches in length. Adult size is variable depending on the subspecies: Hog Island boas (B. c. imperator ssp.) average about 3 or 4 feet in length, while red-tails can grow to approximately 13 feet. Thus, these snakes should be provided with large enclosures. A young boa can be housed in a 20-gallon tank, but it will outgrow such an enclosure rapidly.


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An adult boa should have a cage measuring at least 4 feet long by 2 feet wide by 2 feet tall. The enclosure should be furnished with a large water bowl, an appropriate-sized hidebox and a large, sturdy branch. Shelves placed in the enclosure will increase the amount of surface area available for exercise and activity. Substrates include aspen shavings (avoid cedar), newspaper, outdoor carpeting and others. Temperatures in the boa’s enclosure should run 80 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit during the day, with nighttime temperatures about 78. The basking area should be 95 degrees. The cage should be cleaned regularly, and fresh water should always be available.

Adult boas will consume mice, rats and rabbits. Fresh killed or frozen/thawed items are best. The size of the snake is your guide on what to feed: The prey item’s girth should not be larger than the snake’s girth at its mid-section. Feed an appropriate-sized food item every seven to 10 days for adult boas. Young boas should be fed mice every week.