16 Foot Reticulated Python Stolen In Texas Last July Reunited With OwnerStaff at the center recall seeing a lost post on the Nextdoor app about a lost albino reticulated python, and went into the app and was able to locate the owner.

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16 Foot Reticulated Python Stolen In Texas Last July Reunited With Owner

The snake had apparently been spotted around the neighborhood several times since July.

The owner was visiting the city from Dallas when someone broke into his car and stole the snake, named Snow.

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A 16-foot albino reticulated python (Python reticulatus) that was stolen from her owner has been recovered by the Austin Animal Center in Austin, TX. According to the center’s Facebook page, a call received about a large snake. The snake was lethargic due to the cold weather in Texas and some residents were able to catch the snake and house it in their garage until staff from the center could retrieve it.


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Officer Moorman came to the residence to retrieve it and was greeted by an unhappy 16 foot albino reticulated python that residents said had been roaming the neighborhood since July. The snake was then placed into a temporary enclosure at the Austin Zoo. But that’s not all. Staff at the center recall seeing a lost post on the Nextdoor app about a lost albino reticulated python, and went into the app and was able to locate the owner. The owner was visiting the city from Dallas when someone broke into his car and stole the snake, named Snow. The owner accurately described a unique feature of the snake and retrieved it. Now that is a happy Christmas story.

Reticulated Python Information

The reticulated python is considered the world’s longest snake and one of the three heaviest snakes. It is found throughout much of Southeast and South Asia, including Indonesia, the Philippines, India, and Borneo. The snake is popular with expert reptilekeepers, though prior to captive breeding efforts over the last 30 plus years in the United States, the species was considered hard to handle due to its ill temperament.